Industry news

South-West Show Q and A

The Iconbar - Fri, 01/11/2019 - 08:04
With the South-West Show a month away, we hunted down the organisers for some more details....

We noticed the venue has changed this year. What was the reasoning behind that?
Various exhibitors and some customers have said that as the old venue could only be reached by car that it was not suitable. One exhibitor last year backed out at the last moment citing this as the reason.

Is it still easy to reach via public transport and car?
It is now more easily reached. Bristol Meads mainline station is only 20 minutes walk away there are believe something like 11 bus routes that go past the hotel and it has a large car park off of a main route from the M4 motorway. There is a map on the website http://www.riscos-swshow.co.uk

Bristol is quite a trek for some. Is it possible to stay the night at the hotel? Is anything planned for the night before the show?

Yes it is. Nothing official is planned but usually a few early birds and exhibitors might gather in the bar for a chat.

Any other changes you can tell us about?

The format for the show will be similar to previous years

Who is exhibiting this year?

All the usual suspects. we will have an updated list on the website within the next week or so. But most exhibitors from previous years a few new ones should be coming.

Are you anticipating any interesting announcements this year at the South-West Show?

We always hope that there will be special announcements from the exhibitors.

Anything else you can tell us about?

RISC OS Developments Ltd will be giving a talk at the BCS on the 17th January in London to their Open Source Groups. Details will be on their website shortly.

South-West Show website

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Categories: RISC OS

2019 Annual Technology Predictions for the Upcoming Year

Theresa Miller - Tue, 01/08/2019 - 06:30

We are hoping that everyone had a wonderful holiday season which has brought upon us the brand New Year of 2019!  When that happens we all start reflecting on the past year, and what the New Year will bring.  Here is a list of predictions from many great leaders at great companies in the industry […]

The post 2019 Annual Technology Predictions for the Upcoming Year appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Saving & Restoring Total Commander Tab Sets

Helge Klein - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 17:18

Total Commander’s custom start menu is a great place to quickly launch all kinds of tools and programs that are otherwise hard to get to. However, TC’s start menu is not limited to external tools. It can be used to run internal TC commands, too. In this article, I am using that capability to build a simple solution for saving and restoring sets of Total Commander tabs to and from files.

Why Save and Restore Tab Sets?

The most common use case for multiple tab sets I can think of is people working in different environments or on different projects. Being able to switch the tabs needed at customer A for the tabs needed at customers B, C, or D should be very helpful.

End Result

This is what I am going to build:

The Tabs submenu has entries for loading and saving all tabs from/to a file called %COMPUTERNAME%.tab. This is a simple solution designed as a tab backup. It can easily be extended to a solution that loads and saves multiple different tab sets.

Getting There

Click Start > Change Start Menu… to bring up the dialog that configures Total Commander’s start menu. You might or might not already have entries in your start menu. We are not going to touch them in any way. Instead, we are adding a new section with a Tabs submenu. Instructions:

  1. Navigate to the last of your existing start menu entries.
  2. Add an item with a dash (-) as the title. This creates a dividing horizontal line, separating your existing start menu entries from the new tabs functionality.
  3. Add a submenu with the title Tabs.
  4. In the submenu, add two items.
    • Item 1 title: Load from %COMPUTERNAME%.tab
    • Item 1 command: OPENTABS d:\Data\Total Commander\%COMPUTERNAME%.tab
    • Item 2 title: Save to %COMPUTERNAME%.tab
    • Item 2 command: SAVETABS2L d:\Data\Total Commander\%COMPUTERNAME%.tab

The result should look like this:

Please note:

  • The path used in the commands above must not be enclosed quotes even if it contains spaces.
  • As you can see in the examples, environment variables can be used.
  • The path used above, “d:\Data\Total Commander”, should be adjusted as needed.

That’s it – enjoy!

The post Saving & Restoring Total Commander Tab Sets appeared first on Helge Klein.

3 key dates for your diary in 2019

The Iconbar - Fri, 01/04/2019 - 07:39
While you are still in New Year's resolution mode, there are 3 key dates which should be in your diary for 2019. We are very lucky in the RISC OS World to have 3 Shows spread across the country and they diary. They are where all the big announcements are made, and the chance to meet developers and other RISC OS users. It is worth attending at least one (if not all 3).

So get these dates in your dairy now....

The South-West show takes place on Saturday 16th February, 2019 takes place at a brand new location in Bristol. The show have been moved to make it much easier to reach by public transport.

The Wakefield show is on Saturday, 27th April 2019 at it s regular home at Cedar Court Hotel. This is very easy accessible.

The London Show has not published an official date yet, but always happens at the end of October. We will report on any details as soon as we receive them.

All the shows happen at Hotels, so you can always arrive the night before and meet up with other RISC OS users around the hotel.

Are there any other critical dates for you in the RISC OS Calendar?

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Categories: RISC OS

New - NetScaler Gateway Plug-in v4.4.0 for Mac OS X

Netscaler Gateway downloads - Tue, 01/01/2019 - 18:30
New downloads are available for Citrix Gateway
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New - NetScaler Gateway Plug-in v4.2.7 for Mac OS X

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New - NetScaler Gateway Plug-in v4.4.0 for Mac OS X

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New - NetScaler Gateway Plug-in v4.2.7 for Mac OS X

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December news

The Iconbar - Fri, 12/28/2018 - 10:24
Some things we noticed this month. What did you see?

RISC OS Blog has a review of Island of the Undead

Pipedream 4.56 released.

The long-awaited Riscository Wakefield show report is now ">online

Some interesting things are happening on ">riscos.fr

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Categories: RISC OS

RISC OS interview with Chris Williams

The Iconbar - Mon, 12/24/2018 - 09:20
For your Christmas treat this year, we have an interview with Chris Williams, of Drobe and The Register fame. Enjoy and a very Merry Christmas from Iconbar.

Would you like to introduce yourself?

I'm Chris Williams, former editor of RISC OS news and trouble-making website drobe.co.uk. The site's frozen online right now as an archive because while I used to have a lot of free time to work on it, I graduated university in the mid-2000s, got a real job, and sadly ran out of spare time to maintain it, and so put it in stasis to preserve it. Today, I live and work in San Francisco, editing and writing articles for theregister.co.uk, mostly covering software and chips. I also once upon a time wrote some RISC OS applications, such as EasyGCC to help people build C/C++ projects, and a virtual memory manager that extended the machine's RAM using swap space on disk. If you're using RISC OS Select or 6, there's some of my code in there, too, during boot up.

How long have you been using RISC OS?

Since 1992 when my parents bought an Acorn A5000. So I guess that's about 26 years ago. We upgraded to a RiscPC as soon as we could. I took a StrongARM RPC crammed with add-ons, like an x86 card, IDE accelerator, Viewfinder graphics card, and Ethernet NIC, to uni, and got to know the OS really well. No other operating system I've used since has come close to the simplicity and ease-of-use of the RISC OS GUI, in my opinion. Apple's macOS came really very close, and then the iGiant lost the plot on code quality.

What does RISC OS look like from the USA viewpoint?

It's kinda like BeOS, in that operating system aficionados will know of it and appreciate it for what it is: an early operating system that had an intuitive user interface but was pushed under the wheels of Intel and Microsoft. Folks who experiment with RaspberryPis may also come across it, as it is one of the operating systems listed on raspberrypi.org. In conversation with Americans, or in writing articles, I normally introduce RISC OS as the OS Acorn made for its Arm desktop computers - y'know, Acorn. Acorn Computers. Britain's Apple. The English Amiga. The ones who formed Arm, the people who make all your smartphone processor cores. And then the light bulb turns on.

What's really interesting is what's going on with Arm, and I think that will help, to some extent, RISC OS appear a little on more people's radars. Anyone who's been using RISC OS since the 1990s knows the pain of seeing their friends and colleagues having fun with their Windows PC games and applications, and their Intel and AMD processors, and graphics cards, and so on. Even though RISC OS had a fine user interface, and a decent enough set of software, and fun games, it just was for the most part, incompatible with the rest of the world and couldn't quite keep up with the pace of competitors. It was hard seeing everything coalesce around the x86-Windows alliance, while Acorn lost its way, and Arm was pushing into embedded engineering markets.

Now, Arm is in every corner of our daily lives. It's in phones, tablets, routers, smartcards, hard drives, Internet of Things, gadgets, servers, and even desktops. Microsoft is pushing hard on Windows 10 Arm-based laptops with multi-day battery life, at a time when Intel has got itself stuck in a quagmire of sorts. It blows my mind to go visit US giants like Qualcomm, and Arm's offices in Texas, and see them focusing on Arm-based desktop CPUs, a technology initiative the Acorn era could really have done with. It's just a little mindboggling, to me me anyway, to see Microsoft, so bent on dominating the desktop world with Windows on x86, to the detriment of RISC OS on Arm, now embracing Windows on Arm. I probably sound bitter, though I'm really not - I'm just astonished. That's how life goes around, I guess.

Anyway, it's perhaps something RISC OS can work with, beyond its ports to various interesting systems, if not targeting new hardware then catching attention as an alternative Arm OS. One sticking point is that Arm is gradually embracing 64-bit more and more. It'll support 32-bit for a long while yet, but its latest high-end cores are 64-bit-only at the kernel level.

What other systems do you use?

I use Debian Linux on the desktop, and on the various servers I look after. I was an Apple macOS user as well for a while, though I recently ditched it. The software experience was getting weird, and the terrible quality of the latest MacBook Pro hardware was the final straw. Over the years, I've used FreeBSD and Debian Linux on various Arm chipsets, AMD and Intel x86 processors, and PowerPC CPUs, and even a MIPS32 system. I just got a quad-core 64-bit RISC-V system. I like checking out all sorts of architectures.

What is your current RISC OS setup?

I have a RaspberryPi 2 for booting RISC OS whenever I need it, though my primary environment is Linux. It's what I use during work.

What is your favourite feature/killer program in RISC OS?

Back in the day, I couldn't work without OvationPro, Photodesk, the terminal app Putty, StrongEd, BASIC for prototyping, GCC for software development, Director for organizing my desktop, Netsurf and Oregano, Grapevine... the list goes on.

What would you most like to see in RISC OS in the future?

Many, many more users. People able to access RISC OS more easily, perhaps using a JavaScript-based Arm emulator in a web browser to introduce them to the desktop.

What are your interests beyond RISC OS?

Pretty much making the most of living in California while I'm here, and traveling around the United States to visit tech companies and see what America has to offer. From Hawaii to Utah and Nevada to Texas, Florida and New York, and everything in between. I cycle a lot at the weekends, going over the Golden Gate Bridge and into normal Cali away from the big city, or exploring the East Bay ridge, returning via Berkeley. My apartment is a 15-minute walk from the office, so I tend to cycle a lot to get some exercise. When I was living in the UK, I ran about 48 miles a week, before and after work, which was doable in Essex and London where the streets and paths are flat. That's kinda impossible in San Francisco, where the hills are legendarily steep. I'm happy if I can make it four or five miles.

I also do some programming for fun, mainly using Rust - which is like C/C++ though with a heavy focus on security, speed and multithreading. We really shouldn't be writing application and operating system code in C/C++ any more; Rust, Go, and other languages are far more advanced and secure. C is, after all, assembly with some syntactic sugar. I've also been experimenting with RISC-V, an open-source CPU instruction set architecture that is similar to 64-bit Arm in that they have common roots - the original RISC efforts in the SF Bay Area in the early 1980s. The idea is: the instruction set and associated architecture is available for all to freely use to implement RISC-V-compatible CPU cores in custom chips and processors. Some of these cores are also open-source, meaning engineers can take them and plug them into their own custom chips, and run Linux and other software on them.

Western Digital, Nvidia, and other big names are using or exploring RISC-V as an alternative to Arm, which charges money to license its CPU blueprints and/or architecture. Bringing it all together, I've started writing a small open-source operating system, in my spare time, in Rust for RISC-V called Diosix 2.0 (www.diosix.org). Version 1.0 was a microkernel that ran on x86. The goal is to make a secure Rust-RISC-V hypervisor that can run multiple environments at the same time, each environment or virtual machine in its own hardware-enforced sandbox. That means you can do things like internet banking in one VM sandbox, and emails and Twitter browsing in another, preventing any malicious code or naughty stuff in one VM from affecting whatever's running in another VM.

You can do all this on x86, Arm, and MIPS, of course. But given RISC-V was not bitten by the data-leaking speculative-execution design flaws (aka Meltdown and Spectre) that made life difficult for Intel, AMD, Arm, et al this year, and Rust is a lot safer than C/C++ that today's hypervisors and operating systems are written in, I felt it was worth exploring. Pretty much every Adobe Flash, Windows, iOS, Android, macOS, Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc security update these days is due to some poor programmer accidentally blundering with their C/C++ code, and allowing memory to be corrupted and exploited to execute malicious code. Google made the language of Go, and Mozilla made the language of No: Rust refuses to build software that potentially suffers from buffer overflows, data races, and so on.

It also all helps me in my day job of editing and writing a lot - keeping up to date with chip design, software, security, and so on.

If someone hired you for a month to develop RISC OS software, what would you create?

To be honest, I'd try to find a way to transplant the RISC OS GUI onto other environments, so I can use the window furniture, contextual menus, filer, pinboard, iconbar, etc, on top of a base that runs on modern hardware. I think that would take longer than a month.

What would you most like Father Christmas to bring you as a present?

A larger apartment: rent is bonkers in San Francisco, so I could do with some extra space.

Any questions we forgot to ask you?

Why do vodka martinis always seem like a good idea 90 minutes before it's too late to realize they were a bad idea?

PS: if anyone wants to get in touch, all my contact details are on diodesign.co.uk

You can read lots of other interviews on Iconbar here

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Categories: RISC OS

Citrix User Group XXVII review

Citrix UK User Group - Fri, 12/21/2018 - 15:26

To use the terminology of our CUGC colleagues from the left of “the pond”, this was the UK User Group’s 27th “XL” event (which means we, as always, dedicate a full day to our community sharing, and not just an …

Read more »

The post Citrix User Group XXVII review appeared first on UK Citrix User Group.

New - NetScaler Gateway (Maintenance Phase) Plug-ins and Clients for Build 12.0-60.9

Netscaler Gateway downloads - Thu, 12/20/2018 - 18:30
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New - Components for NetScaler Gateway 12.0

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New - Components for NetScaler Gateway 12.0

Netscaler Gateway downloads - Thu, 12/20/2018 - 18:30
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New - NetScaler Gateway (Maintenance Phase) 12.0 Build 60.9

Netscaler Gateway downloads - Thu, 12/20/2018 - 18:30
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New - NetScaler Gateway (Maintenance Phase) Plug-ins and Clients for Build 12.0-60.9

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Default Start Menu Customisation via Intune

Aaron Parker's stealthpuppy - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 11:47

The promise of a modern management approach to deployment and management of Windows 10 is that you no longer create and manage a custom SOE image. User experience is still important though and a large part of that experience in an enterprise environment, is the default Start menu.

The default Start menu, especially on Windows 10 Pro, is far from enterprise ready right? Take a look at this mess:

Windows 10 Pro 1809 default Start menu

Over-the-air provisioning of PCs via Windows AutoPilot & Microsoft Intune (or insert your MDM solution here), limits the possibilities of customising the target PC before the user logs on. Users then have to live with the default Start menu or one that is defined by the administrator – neither is ideal.

UWP / Microsoft Store apps can be targeted for removal, but those apps won’t be removed until well after login. Compounding the issue of default apps pinned to the Start menu is that some of them aren’t actually installed, so removal won’t occur until the Store downloads and installs updates. That can sometimes be hours after the user has provisioned the PC.

Customise with PowerShell?

PowerShell scripts can be used to remove user and system provisioned Store apps (I have a couple of scripts in my Intune GitHub repository); however, PowerShell scripts in Intune can only be targeted to users and don’t fire until after the first logon. Additionally, I’ve had a crack at using PowerShell to pin and unpin tiles from the Start menu, but found that I can’t interact with the shell (or at least the pin / unpin has no effect) when the script is delivered via Intune.

Looking for Alternatives

With the availability of the Windows Autopilot Enrolment Status page in Windows 10 1803 and above, plus the recent addition of the feature to ‘Block device use until these required apps are installed‘, we might have an opportunity to deploy a customised default Start menu.

The Enrolment Status page tracks security policies and line-of-business (MSI) applications, so a custom default Start menu will have to be packaged into an MSI. Fingers and toes crossed then that this approach works.

Packaging a Start menu Customisation

To package a customised Start menu, we need to create the desired layout and export it with theExport-StartLayout command. Nothing new there – you’ve likely done that before. The next step is to create a custom Windows Installer package to deliver the layout file.

I’m using Advanced Installer to create my deployment package. For this particular project, the Freeware version of Advanced Installer provides all of the features you’ll need to deploy the custom layout file.

Create a Windows Installer Package

Advanced Installer makes short work of creating the package – create a new Simple Installer package and configure the product name, version and publisher. Note that if you want to update the package, save your project and update the version number each time you produce an updated installer.

Add the Start menu layout file to the project under Files and Folders. The project must define the correct target path and file name because it will be deployed into the default profile. Use this path:

Windows Volume\Users\Default\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Shell

And add the LayoutModification.xml file that you’ve exported with Export-StartLayout into this path. If your target path and file name aren’t correct, this won’t work so ensure your package looks the same as the screenshots here.

For this package, I’ve configured the following install parameters:

  • Package type – 64-bit package
  • Installation type – Per-machine only
  • Reboot behaviour – Suppress all reboots and Reboot prompts

Configure the default build to produce a Single MSI file and define the name. In the example below, I’ve used DefaultStartMenuLayout.msi.

Build your package and add the MSI into Microsoft Intune as a line-of-business application. Assign the new application as Required for All Devices, so that the Enrolment Status Page can track the installation before the user logs on.

Configure the Enrolment Status Page

To ensure that the package is delivered to the target PCs before the user logs on, we’ll leverage the Enrolment Status Page (ESP). The ESP is supported on Windows 10 1803 and above, so if you’ve gotten this far into the article and haven’t yet updated to 1803 or higher, you should stop reading and update those machines.

Configure the ESP and enable the ‘Block device use until these required apps are installed if they are assigned to the user/device’ feature. Here select at least the applications whose shortcuts you have configured in your Start layout customisation. This list must include the MSI package containing the customisation itself.

Here’s the applications that I’ve configured in my test environment:

Today the ESP tracks specific application deployments – Microsoft Store apps and single MSI files, while Office 365 ProPlus applications are tracked on Windows 10 1809 and above.

User Experience

Most of my testing is on Windows 10 1809 – with a PC enrolled into Azure AD and Microsoft Intune during the out of box experience, the Enrolment Status Page tracks the installation of policies and applications, including our Start menu customisation. 

After the enrollment and deployment is complete, the user sees a customised Start menu after first logon. There’s a few tiles that didn’t remain pinned from the default customisation, but this is much cleaner and enterprise ready than what we end up with out of the box.

Wrapping Up

Provisioning PCs via Windows AutoPilot and Microsoft Intune is a rapidly changing landscape. So what may not be possible today, is likely to be addressed quickly. In the meantime, there’s usually a custom approach to achieving the end-user experience that you need and this is a great example. 

This article by Aaron Parker, Default Start Menu Customisation via Intune appeared first on Aaron Parker.

Categories: Community, Virtualisation

Product Releases – Soft is OK but don’t be Squidgy

Rachel Berrys Virtually Visual blog - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 11:33
What is a soft product launch?

Wikipedia has a definition of a soft product launch – here; which says: “A soft launch is the release of a website, hotel, or other Product (business) or service to a limited audience. Soft-launching is a method for gathering data on a product’s usage and acceptance in the marketplace, before making it generally available as a hard launch or grand opening. Companies may choose a soft launch to test the viability of a product or to fine-tune a product before implementing a larger marketing effort.”

Note this says – “limited audience”, “gathering data”, “test the viability”, “fine-tune” etc…. later on elaborated on “a small release being made to a limited group of individuals for beta testing.

Often soft launches take the form of “unsupported features” or “early access programs”. In my experience though I have seen a lot of something which I’m going to call “squidgy launches”.

What is a “squidgy” launch?

A squidgy launch is something where the product is released to the whole audience and market but a lot of the information and marketing around it is held back for a grand announcement at a big corporate event or to tie in with a product or financial announcement. The product surreptitiously appears as a new version on an Akamai or similar download site, available for the mass user base to download. This is typically because there isn’t a high-profile announcement opportunity and/or the product can’t be delayed until there is one because of financial constraints (revenue recognition, customer commitment), other product dependencies (i.e. it _has_ to be released in this release to allow another product to release, there’s no other release vehicle before the big show or because of a commitment to certain customers or sales).

Soft launches can be really useful

As a Product Manager, soft launches can be incredibly useful in many ways:

  • Quality control
  • Testing the viability
  • Getting quality feedback from selected customers
But I’m not a fan of “Squidgy” launches

These are technically full product releases, of the technical bits, but missing a lot of the overall _product_ whether that’s doc, feedback mechanisms and marketing explaining the positioning of the feature/product.

There is now this thing called the INTERNET…. if you haven’t heard of it…. It’s a mechanism by which your customers and partners can communicate directly with each other, cutting you out of the conversation. It also gives all those folk interested in your product a mechanism to broadcast whatever message they think is suitable about your product and a way of filling any “voids”.

Typically, a product will have a large number of independent consultants, partners, bloggers, channel partners and analysts with a significant interest in your product, keen to blog, tweet and communicate about it as soon as possible. These folk often have a strong vested interest in filling any information voids left by a launch to establish themselves as the de-facto expert in the field on _your_ product, to answer their customer inquiries when those customers get wind of a new release and to pick up traffic from google searches to their own company and personal websites and blogs, from searches like “is new product version xxx compatible with product yyy”, “should I upgrade to product version ddd.fff”.

It’s not unusual for a product manager/solution architect to get an email enquiry about something not well-documented/obscure and subsequently see the reply repackaged by an internet expert on their own blog! The illusion is convincing but the only real expertise is a knowledge of who to ask alongside cut-n-paste.  This also means that potential traffic, leads and customer conversations are diverted away from your own website.

Additionally, once the sales, marketing departments have negotiated a “squidgy” launch it can have the effect of refocusing deadlines and efforts on the “real”, “hard” launch. So much of the material is not actually available even internally let alone publicly when the product actually becomes available.

Freelancers: Couriering laptops safely and why separating client hardware from your clean underwear supply is a good thing…

Rachel Berrys Virtually Visual blog - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 11:24

From an article I published on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/freelancers-couriering-laptops-safely-why-separating-client-berry/

Sending Laptops by courier. As a freelancer in the UK, I’m increasingly finding clients prefer to issue me with a laptop they have configured, dedicated to just their work, which means I’m always having to triple check if I have the right laptops with me and I’ve got to buy a new laptop bag as the current one has split as a result of optimistically cramming three in it when probably designed for one – oops!

BUT it also means I’m frequently sending/collecting laptops to/from base by motorcycle courier (some don’t trust postal couriers) or FedEx/DHL etc. This process puts some legal obligations on the sender, sometimes me and sometimes the company/organisation and there are a few things to be aware of.

Insurance

Usually for me the client pays and if they are underinsured it is their problem but occasionally it’s my responsibility. Things that I would be aware of and clear up with the client / contractor in writing include:

·       Insurance value; often this is the customs value of the hardware at present day value – this is what you will get if it falls of the back of a lorry; are you underinsured?

·       Insurance liability – unless you specifically arrange it most shipping contracts do not cover indirect loss e.g. if that laptop has your customer database on it and it falls into a competitor’s hands the courier is only on the hook for the hardware costs.

If the client expects you to ship and reclaim, it is probably wise to get written instruction from them on the exact details of the shipping conditions they desire.

Hazardous Labelling

Laptops usually contain Lithium Ion batteries. Although a rare occurrence, they do occasionally spontaneously combust and for the couriers’ staff protection – legally have to be labelled as hazardous and often declared as such in advance on the paperwork (I’ve had some clients not realise that technically a laptop is hazardous). Here’s a frightening CCTV recording from an office in Letchworth, UK where a laptop set fire to a plastics factory.

The best scenario is that you ship hardware around in its original box. Unfortunately, it’s fairly common for the original box to have long since gone to the big recycling centre in the Sky (probably Peterborough). To work around this, I have luckily found a local company who gets through a lot of laptops and when I need a box I just ask them – figuring the hazard labels for a similar laptop should suffice.

The main DHL “Guide to Shipping Dangerous Goods” web pages are a super source of information. The include a summary of shipper’s responsibilities with this key phrase:

·       The shipper is responsible for declaring, packaging and labelling Dangerous Goods. DHL Express will accept Dangerous Goods but with certain restrictions for the different products & services offered and only under certain conditions.

This is where it gets a bit grey for me and I could do with investigating further, often a client will submit the paperwork and my role is putting it in a box and handing it to a courier who turns up at the door. I generally don’t get instructions from the client so it’s a bit vague to me if I’m the shipper or the person filling in the courier forms.

Hazardous Labelling in the UK is changing Dec 2018

In 2017 the regulation on labelling Lithium Ion batteries changed. UK company, Hibiscus PLC have an excellent overview.

Many of the big couriers are very clued up (vs your dodgy bloke in a van like outfit) and luckily I generally only deal with them. DHL have a very good website covering shipping regulation including hazard labelling for Lithium Ion batteries, see here.

The DHL site notes this:

·       As of January 1, 2018 new rules have been introduced for packages containing lithium batteries that are packed and shipped as individual items (loose/bulk), in accordance with Section IA, IB and II of packing instruction 965 or 968.

·       The Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods hazard label can still be used, as part of the transitional period, until the end of December 2018 for packages containing lithium batteries prepared in accordance with Section I, IA or IB of the lithium battery packing instructions.

Having investigated – those second hand laptop boxes often seem to have a Class 9 label so using the original box may not suffice. Another one I will have to think about. Thankfully most major couriers have a dangerous goods helpline (often called the Restricted Commodities Group).

There is plenty advice and opportunity to buy the correct hazard labels online. A google on “lithium ion battery warning label” should suffice. Typically laptops fall under the “contained within” regulation UN3481 (FedEx have some good info) .

Basically if in doubt – ask whoever is arranging the courier to specify the exact contents of the shipment and ask the Courier for appropriate labelling.

International Shipping

It gets even more complicated particularly if the insured value doesn’t match the tax man’s opinion and the laptop gets impounded, but a good courier can talk you through the options. Including anything else in the shipment can also cause impoundment, as a dear friend found when he decided to ship a spare pair of underpants and tube of toothpaste to save on hand-luggage… keep your hardware shipment processes separate from your knicker supply is all the advice I can offer! The rules on shipping Lithium batteries are even more stringent if air freight is involved.

VAT on components such as GPUs

Because of the fields I work in occasionally I handle/test GPUs mostly shipped from abroad. The VAT custom rules are pretty strict and if a card ends up in a retail use or as a sales demo enabler the higher rates are payable; if a card is shipped for R&D or marketing purposes e.g. to a blogger who isn’t going to buy just to write about a lower rate applies. This can cause all sorts of confusion and issues if a card ends up being repurposed and nobody is clear who is on the hook for the VAT. As a freelancer, check the paperwork and make sure the designated use is correct and VAT paid (preferably by someone else) and keep yourself away from tax evasion.

Other best practices when sending freelancers laptops

Some clients are quite good at sensible dos/don’t and you may want to consider

·       Stickers with your company logo identify the hardware and likely whose data is on it making your staff/contractors targets for opportunist overheard conversations or thefts. If a corporate laptop gets left on a train it is instantly identifiable to a dishonest person as to whose data is on it.

·       Labelling machines with their network names renders hiding them on untrusted networks a bit pointless

·       Some clients ship lockable laptop bags – some branded / some unbranded (see above on logo stickers), I’m particularly keen on the unbranded lockable rucksacks when travelling on the London tube/subway.

·       I’d estimate that 80% of my clients have moved to locked down encrypted hard disks, so even if the laptop goes walkies it’s not possible to extract data from the hard disk. If the laptop might have sensitive customer or client data on it is probably the best option. Usually on boot you’ll have to type in a password to access the encrypted disk and then the OS will boot and you use your normal windows password to access the OS.

·       There’s a Citrix employee blog with an anecdote of how he left a laptop on a tram in Amsterdam which then fell into competitive hands containing sensitive data, including confidential project details and sales databases. A good read on how human failure can be the weak point in security.

·       Freelancers probably should consider including a section in their contracts regarding laptop failure and return to base/for repair processes. Contractor laptops seem to be less reliable than most, or are the hardware equivalent of a 1987 Mini Metro (I guess like rental cars they’ve borne the brunt of travel and numerous drivers) and there are a lot of questions you need to know the second a client’s hardware fails – how do you carry on working, how do you get a replacement/repair, do you get paid if can’t work etc

 

 

The Book of Arcade Games reviews

The Iconbar - Fri, 12/14/2018 - 08:36

The Book of Arcade Games was launched at the recent RISC OS London Show.

The 130 page book contains updated and and enhanced listings for 10 of the best Arcade games from the Drag'n'Drop magazine. There is also a introductory guide on how to type in (and Chris was offering the already typed in code to download at the Show).

The Games are all written in BBC BASIC and there is a nice screenshot and description of each before the listing. The type is clear and readable, and the book is spiral bound, so sits flat on your desk. All this makes it very easy to follow the code.

If you are interested in programming RISC OS of just looking for a bit fo fun and nostalgia, I can recommend this book.

You can preview the book online for free and it costs 15 pounds (including postage) from Drag'n'Drop website.

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