Virtualisation

Error message

  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_timezone_set() expects parameter 1 to be DateTime, boolean given in format_date() (line 2062 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).
  • Warning: date_format() expects parameter 1 to be DateTimeInterface, boolean given in format_date() (line 2072 of /home/scslive/public_html/includes/common.inc).

Gartner I&O Conference 2018: What’s next for IT ops?

Theresa Miller - Tue, 12/04/2018 - 15:18

This week I’m attending the Gartner I&O Conference – or the Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations & Cloud Strategies Conference 2018. It used to be called the Gartner Datacenter conference, but times have changed. Now the scope of what we must architect has expanded. Is a datacenter just what you manage on premises? Is it your public cloud […]

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Download, Install, Import Visual C++ Redistributables with VcRedist

Aaron Parker's stealthpuppy - Wed, 11/28/2018 - 23:48

Note: for a more up to date version of the content in this article, VcRedist now has documentation available here: https://docs.stealthpuppy.com/vcredist

Last year I wrote a PowerShell script that can download, install or import the Visual C++ Redistributables into MDT or ConfigMgr. Long-term maintenance of the full feature set in a single script is a little unwieldy so I’ve re-written the script and created a PowerShell module – VcRedist.

Refactoring the script into a module has been a great little project for creating my first PowerShell function and publishing it to the PowerShell Gallery.

Why VcRedist?

At this point, I’m sure you’re saying to yourself – “Aaron, haven’t you just created Chocolatey?”. In a way yes, this module does exactly what you can do with Chocolatey – install the Visual C++ Redistributables directly to the local machine. Although you can download and install all of the supported (and unsupported) Redistributables, the primary aim of the module is to provide a fast way to download and import the Redistributables into the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager for operating system deployments.

Module

The VcRedist module is published to the PowerShell Gallery, which means that it’s simple to install the module and starting importing with a few lines of PowerShell. For example, here’s how you could install the module, download all of the supported Redistributables and import them into an MDT deployment share:

Install-Module -Name VcRedist Import-Module VcRedist $VcList = Get-VcList | Get-VcRedist -Path "C:\Temp\VcRedist" Import-VcMdtApp -VcList $VcList -Path "C:\Temp\VcRedist" -MdtPath "\\server\share\Reference"

This results in each of the Visual C++ Redistributables imported as a separate application with all necessary properties including Version, silent command line, Uninstall Key and 32-bit or 64-bot operating system support.

Visual C++ Redistributables imported into an MDT share with VcRedist

The same approach can be used to import the Redistributables into a ConfigMgr site:

Install-Module VcRedist Import-Module VcRedist $VcList = Get-VcList | Get-VcRedist -Path "C:\Temp\VcRedist" Import-VcCmApp -VcList $VcList -Path "C:\Temp\VcRedist" -CMPath "\\server\share\VcRedist" -SMSSiteCode LAB

Just like MDT, each Redistributable is imported into ConfigMgr; however, Import-VcCmApp copies the Redistributables to a share for distribution and creates and application with a single deployment for each one.

Visual C++ Redistributables imported into ConfigMgr with VcRedist

Of course, the module can download and install the Redistributables to the local machine:

Install-Module VcRedist Import-Module VcRedist $VcList = Get-VcList | Get-VcRedist -Path "C:\Temp\VcRedist" $VcList | Install-VcRedist -Path C:\Temp\VcRedist

By default, this installs all of the supported Redistributables:

Visual C++ Redistributables installed locally with VcRedist

Note that the 2015 and 2017 Redistributables are the same version, so the end result will include only the 2017 versions.

Functions

This module includes the following functions:

Get-VcList

This function reads the Visual C++ Redistributables listed in an internal manifest or an external XML file into an array that can be passed to other VcRedist functions. Running Get-VcList will return the supported list of Visual C++ Redistributables. The function can read an external XML file that defines a custom list of Visual C++ Redistributables.

Export-VcXml

Run Export-VcXml to export the internal Visual C++ Redistributables manifest to an external XML file. Use -Path to define the path to the external XML file that the manifest will be saved to. By default Export-VcXml will export only the supported Visual C++ Redistributables.

Get-VcRedist

To download the Visual C++ Redistributables to a local folder, use Get-VcRedist. This will read the array of Visual C++ Redistributables returned from Get-VcList and download each one to a local folder specified in -Path. Visual C++ Redistributables can be filtered for release and processor architecture.

Install-VcRedist

To install the Visual C++ Redistributables on the local machine, use Install-VcRedist. This function again accepts the array of Visual C++ Redistributables passed from Get-VcList and installs the Visual C++ Redistributables downloaded to a local path with Get-VcRedist. Visual C++ Redistributables can be filtered for release and processor architecture.

Import-VcMdtApp

To install the Visual C++ Redistributables as a part of a reference image or for use with a deployment solution based on the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit, Import-VcMdtApp will import each of the Visual C++ Redistributables as a separate application that includes silent command lines, platform support and the UninstallKey for detecting whether the Visual C++ Redistributable is already installed. Visual C++ Redistributables can be filtered for release and processor architecture.

Each Redistributables will be imported into the deployment share with application properties for a successful deployment.

Import-VcCMApp

To install the Visual C++ Redistributables with System Center Configuration Manager, Import-VcCmApp will import each of the Visual C++ Redistributables as a separate application that includes the application and a single deployment type. Visual C++ Redistributables can be filtered for release and processor architecture.

Tested On

Tested on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 with PowerShell 5.1. Install-VcRedist and Import-VcMdtApp require Windows and the MDT Workbench. Get-VcList, Export-VcXml and Get-VcRedist do work on PowerShell Core; however, most testing is completed on Windows PowerShell.

To Do

Right now, I have a few tasks for updating the module, including:

  • Additional testing / Pester tests
  • Add -Bundle to Import-VcMdtApp to create an Application Bundle and simplify installing the Redistributables
  • Documentation updates

For full details and further updates, keep an eye on the repository and test out the module via the PowerShell Gallery.

Image credit:

Alexey Ruban

This article by Aaron Parker, Download, Install, Import Visual C++ Redistributables with VcRedist appeared first on Aaron Parker.

Categories: Community, Virtualisation

Amazon’s Showcase of Innovation at AWS re:Invent 2018

Theresa Miller - Tue, 11/27/2018 - 06:30

The time is upon us for one of the year’s most anticipated technology conferences. Amazon’s re:Invent 2018 has kicked off in Las Vegas and is full of new products and innovations, with more to be announced throughout the week. Now, let’s take a look at what kicks off re:Invent 2018 AWS RoboMaker Makes Robotics Accessible […]

The post Amazon’s Showcase of Innovation at AWS re:Invent 2018 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Enabling HTTP/2 in Apache on Ubuntu 18.04

Helge Klein - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 02:14

A number of requirements must be met before HTTP/2 can be enabled for a website. This is a compilation of steps I went through to get HTTP/2 working on our Apache web server hosting WordPress sites.

HTTP/2 Requirements Requirement #1: HTTPS

HTTP/2 only works with HTTPS. If you have not switched your site to HTTPS, now is the time to do it. You might be interested in my article Switching a WordPress Site From HTTP to HTTPS.

Requirement #2: Apache 2.4.24

The first version of Apache to support HTTP/2 is 2.4.24. If you are on the LTS branch of Ubuntu, this means you need to upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04. I will describe the upgrade process from 16.04 to 18.04 in another blog post.

Requirement #3: PHP FPM

Short version: if you run PHP in Apache via mod_php, you need to switch to FPM. That is not a bad thing. FPM is newer and faster.

Long version: HTTP/2 is not compatible with Apache’s prefork multi-processing module. However, prefork basically seems to be obsolete so it does not hurt to switch to something more modern, i.e., the event MPM. That, in turn, requires a change in the PHP module from mod_php to php7.x-fpm.

Configuration Changes for HTTP/2 Switching Apache’s PHP Module from MPM Prefork to Event

Run the following commands:

sudo apt-get install php7.2-fpm sudo a2enmod proxy_fcgi sudo a2enconf php7.2-fpm sudo a2dismod php7.2 sudo a2dismod mpm_prefork sudo a2enmod mpm_event sudo service apache2 restart Caveat: W3 Total Cache Shows Apache Modules as Not Detected

W3 Total Cache seems to rely on the function apache_get_modules() to detect Apache modules, which does not work with FPM. According to this support article from Plesk, this issue can be ignored.

Installing and Enabling HTTP/2 in Apache

Enable the module mod_http2:

sudo a2enmod http2 sudo service apache2 restart

Enable the HTTP/2 protocol by adding the following to /etc/apache2/apache2.conf:

Protocols h2 http/1.1 How to Verify that HTTP/2 is Working

Cloudflare put together a comprehensive list of ways you can check a website for HTTP/2 support. The easiest to use are probably Chrome Dev Tools (network view, add the Protocol column) or the online test from KeyCDN.

The post Enabling HTTP/2 in Apache on Ubuntu 18.04 appeared first on Helge Klein.

How to Limit CPU & RAM via the Windows Boot Configuration

Helge Klein - Wed, 11/21/2018 - 00:40

Testing the effects of different CPU and memory configurations is easiest when you run the tests on a powerful machine and restrict it to the required number of CPU cores and amount of RAM. Microsoft’s documentation of the relevant command is missing an essential parameter. Here are the commands you need.

Limiting the CPU to N Cores

On an elevated command prompt run:

bcdedit /set {current} numproc NUMBER_OF_CORES

Note: strangely, the numproc parameter is missing from the Microsoft documentation of bcdedit. However, it still works fine on Windows 10 1803.

Limiting the RAM to N MB

On an elevated command prompt run:

bcdedit /set {current} removememory MB_TO_REMOVE_FROM_INSTALLED_RAM With: MB_TO_REMOVE_FROM_INSTALLED_RAM = INSTALLED_RAM - DESIRED_RAM

This is unnecessarily complicated. Instead of specifying the total RAM you want Windows to see, you specify how much of the installed RAM to remove (in MB).

Removing a Bcdedit Setting

To remove a setting, run the following on an elevated command prompt:

bcdedit /deletevalue {current} SETTING_NAME E.g.: bcdedit /deletevalue {current} numproc

The post How to Limit CPU & RAM via the Windows Boot Configuration appeared first on Helge Klein.

Troubleshooting Insights for Success Within your Epic Deployment

Theresa Miller - Thu, 11/15/2018 - 18:34

Healthcare organizations that deploy Epic to support the patients that they see every day have a responsibility to ensure that Epic is always online and performing well.  Take for example, a hospital that uses Epic for all its patient services to keep the patients healthy and to ensure their safety Epic needs to be online […]

The post Troubleshooting Insights for Success Within your Epic Deployment appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Using Procmon To Find Registry Settings

Theresa Miller - Thu, 11/15/2018 - 06:30

Process Monitor (a.k.a. Procmon) is a free Microsoft utility as a part of their Sysinternal Suite, created by the famous Mark Russinovich. The suite has a large amount of incredibly useful tools for Microsoft IT Pros and Developers, but can be overwhelming to start with and look at. Procmon is a great one to start with, […]

The post Using Procmon To Find Registry Settings appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Supercomputing 2018, a conference for enterprise architects?

Theresa Miller - Tue, 11/06/2018 - 08:01

I’m in Barcelona for VMworld as the 2018 tech conference winds down, but I’m eager to attend Supercomputing next week in Dallas.  This conference has been around since 1988, and about 11,000 people attend. It is billed as the international conference for HPC (High Performance Computing), networking, storage, and analysis. That sounds like what most […]

The post Supercomputing 2018, a conference for enterprise architects? appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Laudation to E2EVC – Experts to Experts Virtualization Conference

Helge Klein - Wed, 10/31/2018 - 22:19

On the eve of my departure for E2EVC Athens I feel it is time for a laudation. Let me explain why.

Athens will be my 22nd E2EVC out of 40 events total. In the past eight years, I attended every single E2EVC event in Europe and the US. There is a reason for that, of course. It is certainly not an overabundance of time on my part or even wanderlust. It is simply the fact that E2EVC’s creator, Alex Cooper, has done the most remarkable thing. He single-handedly established the Citrix community in Europe (and helped along the greater end-user community quite a bit). That is a – very – significant achievement.

He single-handedly established the Citrix community in Europe

How did Alex do that? I am not sure how it started (because I was not around at the time). But I know why E2EVC has been by far the best conference for the past eight years: content and community. You could also rephrase it as “knowledge and networking”.

Great speakers almost guarantee great content, which in turn attracts attendees. But that is not all; Alex added a few clever twists. One, the conference is (mostly) on a weekend. This ensures that only the really passionate folks attend. Two, Alex organizes a community night out with food and drinks (often paid for by a sponsor). This brings people together. Three, Alex makes it easy to get a session slot (unlike almost every other conference). Many CTPs and MVPs learned the ropes at E2EVC, including myself.

The result is truly remarkable. I would guess that about 50% of attendees are regulars like myself while the other 50% are newbies or people that “hop on and off the bus”.

Taking a look at the content lined up for the Athens conference, we have sessions about topics and technologies from a broad range of end-user computing, cloud, virtualization and networking topics like the following (a selection):

  • Windows 10 VDI
  • Citrix App Layering automation
  • Windows Server 2019 Software-Defined Datacenter
  • Citrix Cloud on Azure
  • EUC: past, present and future
  • Citrix NetScaler automation
  • Workspace solutions in Azure
  • Web app UX monitoring with uberAgent
  • Containerization with Docker
  • MSIX for Enterprises
  • State of MDM
  • AMD datacenter GPUs for virtualization
  • Microsoft RDMi
  • Graphics acceleration update
  • Amazon AppStream and Amazon WorkSpaces
  • Security for EUC Admins
  • VMware Horizon in AWS
  • RES 2 Ivanti Workspace Manager

In addition to those 45-minute sessions, there are a number of 4-hour masterclasses on topics like:

What else is there to say? That E2EVC moves between cities that are attractive, affordable and easy to reach? That Alex personally operates an airport shuttle for attendees?

I am going to close this article with a big thanks to Alex and his team. Without them, I would not have met so many amazing people, I would not have learned so much, and I would have had far less fun doing so. In short: I would not be where I am today.

The post Laudation to E2EVC – Experts to Experts Virtualization Conference appeared first on Helge Klein.

Splunking the Aspect Ratio Distribution of National Flags

Helge Klein - Tue, 10/30/2018 - 21:04

When I tried to align the Union Jack and the flag of Germany on a presentation slide I noticed that I couldn’t – their aspect ratios are different. A quick search led me to this list of aspect ratios of national flags on Wikipedia. Apparently, national flags are far from standardized. A broad range of aspect ratios is being used. I decided to start a little fun project finding out which aspect ratios are most common.

Wikipedia Table to CSV

Wikipedia’s list comes as an HTML table. I would need the data as CSV for any kind of further processing. As it turns out, there is a website for exactly that: Convert Wiki Tables to CSV. You feed it the URL of the Wikipedia page you are interested in and it converts any tables on said page to CSV.

Cleaning up the CSV

Ultimately I wanted to process the CSV data in Splunk because that is the analytics tool I know best. Before I imported the data into Splunk, however, I wanted to clean it up a little. For that, Excel seemed easiest. When you paste CSV into Excel it sadly is not smart enough to offer splitting it into multiple columns. But that is achieved easily enough with the Text to Columns function.

After I had split the comma-separated table fields into columns again, I noticed that the Ratio column had both the fraction and the decimal value, separated by a space, e.g., “2:3 (1.5)”. So I repeated the splitting procedure to move the decimal value into a new column I would then discard along with some other unnecessary columns. I was left with the two columns Country and Ratio.

Statistics

Once I had saved the resulting data to a new CSV file I turned to Splunk. The easiest way to import a CSV file is the Add Data wizard which guides you through the process. I had the wizard create a new index national_flags for the data I was importing so as to have a dedicated container that would later be easy to identify and ultimately delete.

Once imported, I whipped up a quick SPL search to calculate the percentage of the 10 most common aspect ratios. When you are not totally new to Splunk these kinds of things are almost laughably easy, yet you always have full control over every aspect of the process. Here is what I used:

index=national_flags | top 10 Ratio | stats sum(percent) as Percent by Ratio | sort -Percent Explanation of the Search
index=national_flags
Selects all data from the specified index
top 10 Ratio
Selects the 10 most common values of the field Ratio and adds a new field percent to every row
stats sum(percent) as Percent by Ratio
Groups percent (renamed to Percent) by Ratio. This is not strictly necessary but makes the visualization easier.
sort -Percent
Sort by the field Percent (descending)
Visualization

The only thing left to do was to click Visualization for Splunk to generate the following chart:

Popular Aspect Ratios

Out of the 257 national flags in Wikipedia’s list by far the two most popular aspect ratios are 2:3 (~42%) and 1:2 (~33%). The third most popular aspect ratio, 3:5, is already as low as ~8%.

Data Table

For those interested, below is a table of the aspect ratio distribution. I created it by running the following Splunk search, exporting the results to CSV and converting it to HTML here.

index=national_flags | top 200 Ratio Aspect Ratio Distribution Table Ratio count percent 2:3 107 41.634241 1:2 84 32.684825 3:5 21 8.171206 5:8 6 2.334630 3:4 5 1.945525 10:19 4 1.556420 8:11 3 1.167315 7:10 2 0.778210 5:7 2 0.778210 4:7 2 0.778210 1:1 2 0.778210 ~1.618 1 0.389105 7:11 1 0.389105 6:7 1 0.389105 4:5 1 0.389105 28:37 1 0.389105 22:41 1 0.389105 2.6625:4 1 0.389105 2.338:3.608 1 0.389105 19:36 1 0.389105 18:25 1 0.389105 189:335 1 0.389105 17:26 1 0.389105 16:25 1 0.389105 15:22 1 0.389105 13:15 1 0.389105 11:28 1 0.389105 11:20 1 0.389105 11:18 1 0.389105 0.82 1 0.389105

The post Splunking the Aspect Ratio Distribution of National Flags appeared first on Helge Klein.

Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log (January 2018 edition)

Microsoft Virtualisation Blog - Tue, 01/23/2018 - 22:57

Hyper-V has changed over the last few years and so has our event log structure. With that in mind, here is an update of Ben’s original post in 2009 (“Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log”).

This post gives a short overview on the different Windows event log channels that Hyper-V uses. It can be used as a reference to better understand which event channels might be relevant for different purposes.

As a general guidance you should start with the Hyper-V-VMMS and Hyper-V-Worker event channels when analyzing a failure. For migration-related events it makes sense to look at the event logs both on the source and destination node.

Below are the current event log channels for Hyper-V. Using “Event Viewer” you can find them under “Applications and Services Logs”, “Microsoft”, “Windows”.
If you would like to collect events from these channels and consolidate them into a single file, we’ve published a HyperVLogs PowerShell module to help.

Event Channel Category Description Hyper-V-Compute Events from the Host Compute Service (HCS) are collected here. The HCS is a low-level management API. Hyper-V-Config This section is for anything that relates to virtual machine configuration files. If you have a missing or corrupt virtual machine configuration file – there will be entries here that tell you all about it. Hyper-V-Guest-Drivers Look at this section if you are experiencing issues with VM integration components. Hyper-V-High-Availability Hyper-V clustering-related events are collected in this section. Hyper-V-Hypervisor This section is used for hypervisor specific events. You will usually only need to look here if the hypervisor fails to start – then you can get detailed information here. Hyper-V-StorageVSP Events from the Storage Virtualization Service Provider. Typically you would look at these when you want to debug low-level storage operations for a virtual machine. Hyper-V-VID These are events form the Virtualization Infrastructure Driver. Look here if you experience issues with memory assignment, e.g. dynamic memory, or changing static memory while the VM is running. Hyper-V-VMMS Events from the virtual machine management service can be found here. When VMs are not starting properly, or VM migrations fail, this would be a good source to start investigating. Hyper-V-VmSwitch These channels contain events from the virtual network switches. Hyper-V-Worker This section contains events from the worker process that is used for the actual running of the virtual machine. You will see events related to startup and shutdown of the VM here. Hyper-V-Shared-VHDX Events specific to virtual hard disks that can be shared between several virtual machines. If you are using shared VHDs this event channel can provide more detail in case of a failure. Hyper-V-VMSP The VM security process (VMSP) is used to provide secured virtual devices like the virtual TPM module to the VM. Hyper-V-VfpExt Events form the Virtual Filtering Platform (VFP) which is part of the Software Defined Networking Stack. VHDMP Events from operations on virtual hard disk files (e.g. creation, merging) go here.

Please note: some of these only contain analytic/debug logs that need to be enabled separately and not all channels exist on Windows client. To enable the analytic/debug logs, you can use the HyperVLogs PowerShell module.

Alles Gute,

Lars

Categories: Microsoft, Virtualisation

FCUGC – 4eme edition !

Archy.net - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 17:29

La 4eme edition de cet évènement se déroulera donc au Hard Rock café à Paris, le programme est très complet :

  • Introduction et présentation du FCUGC
  • Présentation de notre sponsor – eG Innovations
  • Cyber Security Strategy with Citrix Technologies : Intrusion Scenario on XenApp Server – Sébastien Reybier – Citrix Security Architect @ Société Générale
  • « Xen Treats » – Stéphane Thirion – CTP – CTO @ Activlan
  • Geek Speak animé par Samuel LEGRAND – CTP – CEO @ LegSam Consulting
  • Discussion libre autour d’un aperitif dinatoire

Nous comptons sur vous pouvoir vous joindre à nous, inviter vos collègues, clients, bref, tout le monde sera le bienvenu et dépêchez vous car les places partent vite !

Pour vous inscrire : https://www.eventbrite.fr/e/billets-fcugc-french-citrix-user-group-community-4th-event-39627500922

Categories: Community, Virtualisation

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